health care  
 
All information on kidney stones composition of kidney stone symptoms of kidney stones causes of kidney stones risk factors for kidney stones diagnosis of kidney stones treatment of kidney stones kidney stone medication kidney stone diet

What are the symptoms of kidney stones?

Kidney stones that are above the pelvis of the kidney (the basin-shaped cavity at the base of each kidney into which urine is funneled) usually do not cause symptoms. Symptoms often occur when a stone migrates into the ureter, the tube that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder, and prevents the drainage of urine from the kidney.

Kidney stones may remain in the kidney or travel through the ureter, the bladder, and the urethra without causing symptoms. When stones are present in the ureter, a person may experience the following symptoms:

  • Sudden, constant pain. Stones may cause intense pain in the back, side, abdomen, groin, or genitals. People who have had a kidney stone often describe the pain as "the worst pain I've ever had." However, small sand-sized stones may travel through the urinary system without causing pain. Pain is the major symptom of a kidney stone. A cramping pain (called renal colic) may be felt as the muscular wall of the ureter contracts in an attempt to push the stone to the bladder. The pain may be on the side of the abdomen or in the middle of the abdomen (if the stone is at the beginning of the ureter). It also may travel into the groin (if the stone is lower in the ureter). In some cases, the pain is severe enough to require medication.
  • Nausea and vomiting. These symptoms often accompany severe pain caused by a kidney stone.
  • Blood in the urine (hematuria), which can occur either with stones that stay in the kidney or with those that travel through the ureters. A person may be able to see blood in the urine, or it might be detected through a laboratory test. The presence of blood is the result of damage to the lining of the ureter or tissue damage inside the kidney.
  • Frequent and painful urination, which may occur when the stone is in the ureter or after the stone has left the bladder and is in the urethra. Painful urination may occur when a urinary tract infection is also present.
  • Fever.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Diarrhea or constipation.
  • Profuse sweating (diaphoresis).
  • General tiredness.
  • More information on kidney stones

    What are kidney stones? - Kidney stones are solid accretions (crystals) of dissolved minerals in urine found inside the kidneys or ureters. Also known as nephrolithiasis, urolithiasis or renal calculi.
    What are kidney stones made of? - Kidney stones consist of a center that consists of crystal-like substances, and a surrounding region that is composed of layers. Kidney stones are composed of different chemical substances.
    What are the symptoms of kidney stones? - Symptoms often occur when a stone migrates into the ureter, the tube that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder, and prevents the drainage of urine from the kidney.
    What causes kidney stones? - The development of the stones is related to decreased urine volume or increased excretion of stone-forming components such as calcium, oxalate, urate, cystine, xanthine, and phosphate.
    What are the risk factors for kidney stones? - Kidney stones affect about 12% of men and 5% of women by the time they are 70 years old. Kidney stones that strike women are more apt to occur during pregnancy.
    How are kidney stones diagnosed? - Diagnosis of renal stone disease involves a medical history, physical examination, laboratory evaluation, and imaging tests.
    What're treatment options for kidney stones? - Treatments of kidney stones include dietary modifications (including the advice to drink plenty of water), medications, and use of a lithotriptor.
    What drug treatments are available for treatment and prevention of kidney stones? - Diuretics are commonly used in the treatment of high blood pressure and other disorders to eliminate fluid and sodium from the body. Citrate salts are often given to people with calcium oxalate or uric acid stones.
    What dietary factors and lifestyle measures are used for prevention of kidney stones? - The most important recommendations for reducing the risk for calcium stones are increasing fluid intake, restricting sodium, and reducing protein intake.
    Men's health Mainpage

    Topics in men's health

    Andropause
    Atrial septal defect
    High blood pressure (hypertension)
    Low blood pressure (hypotension)
    Cholesterol
    Obesity
    Diabetes mellitus
    Alcoholism & drinking
    Balanitis
    Cryptorchidism (undescended testicle)
    Orchitis
    Epispadias
    Bladder exstrophy
    Epididymitis
    Hypospadias (birth defect)
    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA)
    Vasectomy
    Micropenis
    Impotence
    Hair Loss (baldness)
    Peyronie's disease
    Phimosis
    Benign prostatic Hyperplasia
    Prostatitis
    Kidney stones
    Quit smoking
    Ventricular septal defect (VSD)


    All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005